My Work

My strength is in “macro design” which I define as observing the broadest view possible and then distilling that complexity into a simplified and engaging user-centered experience. I try to apply this methodology to all my work, from developing business strategies to designing simple wireframes.

I strongly believe that if we are going to resuscitate our ailing health care system, change needs to start at the individual level by taking responsibility for personal wellness. However, at the moment we still don’t have great tools to do this effectively, often due to poor design – I want to help change that.


Background

Drawing from over 10 years in start-ups and corporate healthcare companies, and from an ongoing and deep passion for healthcare innovation, I have worked with medical software, device, pharma, biotech and provider organizations both large and small. My focus has always been on design to communicate a more empathetic perspective. I have led multi-disciplinary teams and successfully delivered global projects to market.

My professional objectives are to design, develop, and distribute consumer health care technologies that are easy to use and which engage, motivate, and encourage individuals to take ownership of their health and wellbeing.


Projects

BILPIL ©2009 Maren ConnaryAt the moment I work on the Innovation and Advanced Technology team at Kaiser Permanente, the largest integrated care HMO in the US. A few years ago I was running HealthCamp SFBay, a healthcare innovation “unconference” that brought together hundreds of entrepreneurs, health professionals, technologists each year.

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As a Global Marketing Communications Manager at Bayer HealthCare, I led a multi-disciplinary team to redesign the entire Diabetes Care line of blood glucose monitor packaging. Below left is where the packaging started (clinical, a bit cold, and purely functional) and where we ended up (bright and invigorating while maintaining the sense of clinical excellence):

Old Design

Before

New Design

After

Old Design

Before

New Design

After

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